First Robot-Guided Cervical Spine Surgery

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No, R2D2 was not in charge…it was S. Samuel Bederman, M.D. from The University of California at Irvine’s Orthopaedic Spine Center…he is the first surgeon in the U.S. to perform robot-guided surgeries on the cervical spine. Dr. Bederman used Mazor Robotics’ Renaissance system to perform two cervical spine surgeries earlier this year.

The first surgery was performed on a 62-year-old male with a history of neck pain that radiated to his arm. The second procedure was performed on a 71-year-old female with a severely curved neck (scoliosis and kyphosis). Dr. Bederman relieved pressure on pinched nerves and stabilized the neck in both cases. The patients are now free of pain and have a normal neck profile.

Doron Dinstein, VP for Marketing at Mazor, told OTW,

Mazor Robotics’ Renaissance system enables surgeons to accurately and easily instrument the spine. This is especially important in cases where line of sight is challenging, such as in minimally invasive surgeries, or where the anatomy is complex or challenging, such as in deformity corrections, revision surgeries or when trying to execute cervical pedicle screws. Renaissance has unique bone-mounted platforms to interface with the patient’s spine, assuring accuracy. It has a very short learning curve for the surgeon and OR staff, and is easily and quickly integrated clinically.

The process: the surgeon plans the surgical approach based on the patient’s CT. In the OR, the surgeon is guided by Renaissance to accurately execute the preoperative surgical “blueprint,” which is especially critical in cervical pedicle screws, revisions and basically any posterior instrumentation of the spine, with the potential to reduce exposure to radiation.

 

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