New Study Finds Shock-Wave Therapy for Unhealed Fractured Bones as Effective as Surgery

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New Study Finds Shock-Wave Therapy for Unhealed Fractured Bones as Effective as Surgery

Non-Invasive, Low-Complication Treatment Helps Heal Fractures

ROSEMONT, Ill., Nov. 2 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- When fractured bones fail to heal, a serious complication referred to as "nonunion" can develop.  Thisoccurs when the process of bone healing is interrupted or stalled.  According to a new study published in the November 2009 issue of The Journal of Bone andJoint Surgery (JBJS), certain cases involving nonunions respond very well to shock-wave therapy.  Researchers say this non-invasive treatment is equallyeffective as surgery when it comes to healing the bone.

"We found that extracorporeal (external to body) shock-wave therapy was just as effective as surgery in helping to heal and repair nonunions," said leadauthor of the study Angelo Cacchio, MD, a physiatrist who conducted the study with colleagues from the Division of Orthopaedic Surgery and the Department ofPhysical Medicine and Rehabilitation at San Salvatore Hospital in L'Aquila, Italy.

Study authors say sparse surrounding vascular tissue and limited blood supply can lead to a nonunion and can subsequently delay or prevent healing.  Thiscomplication -- a nonunion -- often is very difficult to treat.

Dr. Cacchio and his colleagues analyzed data from 126 patients who had nonunions of the femur (thigh bone), tibia (shinbone), ulna (forearm) orradius (forearm). Patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups and all patient outcomes were evaluated from 2001 to 2004. The patients in thethree groups had similar demographic characteristics and similarly timed and developed nonunions. The first two groups of patients received surgery to helprepair their fracture. The third received four shock-wave therapy sessions at weekly intervals, with 4000 impulses per session.

The study found that shock-wave therapy:

   --  Stimulated healing of the bone within six months; and

   --  Provided a comparable outcome to surgery even two years following the       treatment.

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