Vertos Medical’s mild® Procedure Gets Nod from Leading Pain Medicine Physicians

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ALISO VIEJO, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Leading interventional pain physicians from key U.S. centers gathered at a special June 29 clinical symposium to share their experience with Vertos Medical’s mild (Minimally Invasive Lumbar Decompression), the least invasive surgical procedure for treating lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), with no implants left behind.* Their early clinical experiences suggest that mild may be an appropriate treatment alternative earlier in the LSS progression, as mild patients have shown favorable results when comparing post-treatment improvement at three months to open surgical procedure patient results at one year1. Moreover, mild leaves future surgical options open.

The June 29 symposium, which coincided with the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP) 11th annual meeting in Arlington, Va., was headlined by respected pain medicine experts Wade Wong, D.O., professor of Radiology and Anesthesiology and chief of Interventional and Spine Neuroradiology, University of California, San Diego; and Bohdan Chopko, M.D., Ph.D., clinical faculty member at Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine and practicing neurosurgeon at Mid-Ohio Neurosurgical Care, Mansfield, Ohio. Symposium content included a mild clinical experience review, a didactic on mild patient selection and procedure execution, and a hands-on cadaver workshop.

Among the key data unveiled at the symposium were comparative Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores from an initial mild clinical study and from a published study on open surgical treatment for LSS. These data, presented by Dr. Chopko, indicated that mild patients showed excellent improvement at three months post-op compared to open surgery patients at 12 months post-op. mild patients also showed impressive improvement in Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores at three months post-op.

“The early clinical data show that, with mild, LSS patients can achieve substantial relief earlier in the treatment cascade, before their condition degenerates to the point of requiring open surgery,” said Dr. Chopko. “This is important news not only for patients but for the health care system, as treating patients earlier with mild is anticipated to produce significant cost savings over extended medical management and eventual open surgery.”

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